Horsted Place - a country house with history

History of Horsted Place

A striking Victorian Gothic mansion

Horsted Place is one of the finest examples of Gothic revivalist architecture to be found in Britain today. Built by George Myers in 1850 for Francis Barchard, much of the detail was designed by Augustus Pugin, widely regarded as England's most influential early Victorian Architect.

In 1965 the house was sold to Lord and Lady Rupert Nevill who undertook a complete refurbishment of the property and commissioned the leading 20th Century landscape architect, Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe, to redesign the grounds and gardens. Various mature trees and shrubs were moved from the Nevills' previous residence, Uckfield House, including a myrtle tree grown from a sprig taken from Queen Victoria's wedding bouquet.

As a long standing friend of the Duke of Edinburgh, Lord Rupert Nevill regularly entertained HM the Queen and HRH Prince Philip at Horsted Place.

Today, guests can re-trace her Majesty's footsteps by following the Queen's Walk - an enchanting path through the grounds to Little Horsted's Norman church where the royal couple worshipped whilst staying with the Nevills.